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Hemispheric South/s
 
People | Events | Bibliographies

 

Bibliographies

 

Preliminary Bibliography of New Southern Studies / Global Souths

Bibliographic Narrative:

As with the Hemispheric Studies bibliography, I began compiling the New Southern Studies/Global South bibliography by referencing the texts from the Southern Studies in the Americas FTE proposal.  The bibliography that follows stems mainly from the works cited by those in the field attempting to define the contours of this critical turn in Southern Studies.  Sometimes, the editors of these particular anthologies will cite texts from other anthologies that have already been included in the bibliography.  Risking repetition, I still decided to include these particular articles on their own in order to highlight their prominence in these field defining articles.
Because I am less familiar with Southern Studies, I will summarize one article in particular as groundwork for future synthesis of this field in flux.  In “Global Contexts, Local Literatures: The New  Southern Studies,” McKee and Trefzer introduce works that reconceptualize the field of Southern Studies as they demonstrate what this new scholarship should look like.  Such a shift within the field of Southern Studies (newly termed New Southern Studies) begins with a groundwork consideration of the South as a porous construct, one that inflects and is inflected by the global. This shift constitutes a departure from notions of the South as an insular and contained space, with agreed upon cultural and geographical demarcations.  In this recognition of the fluidity of geographical boundaries and of the idea of the “South” itself, scholars have considered and anxiously asked questions about the ever fluctuating contours of the field itself. For example, some scholars have opened the geographic terrain to consider the U.S. South as a northern extension of the Caribbean.  Despite anxieties about the dimensions of the field, new dialogues, questions, and concerns emerge out of these crucial paradigmatic shifts—especially as they intersect with American Studies, Hemispheric Studies, Studies of the Global South, and Race/Ethnic Studies.

Compiling the bibliography proved to be considerable but productive task precisely because of the above anxieties and questions on the fluctuating boundaries of the field.  In adding onto the list of works dealing with New Southern Studies, I found myself wondering about the parameters of what to include in a field that is being so productively deconstructed.  For instance, because New Southern Studies seems to be a subset of the Hemispheric/Transnational/Global turn in American Studies proper, I wondered how I may be representing the dynamic relationship between the two overlapping fields by simply including, excluding, or doubling up certain texts.  For example, what is being articulated by including the texts of Caribbean Studies in both bibliographies?  This particular inclusion brings up a host of questions about how far (geographically and theoretically) can the field be expanded and boundaries pushed.  As McKee and Trefzer have mentioned, scholars have begun to include texts under the rubric of “Southerness” that fall outside the regional, linguistic, geopolitical boundaries of the U.S.: “The ‘‘Southern’’ canon suddenly opens wide to include the literature of Latin America and South America, Mexico, the Caribbean, Cuba, and any other place in the global South. It makes room for writers and texts not typically part of the Southern literary canon, texts in French, Spanish, Portuguese, and other languages” (682).  Given this, I wondered if it would be fair game to include Latin American Studies itself as part of the New Southern Studies repertoire.  To do so raises what seems to be precisely the questions contained within the Hemispheric South/s initiative itself: how do we articulate the contours of the field when we collapse the two lists?  What kinds of ethical/political questions emerge from collapsing the two?  What is at stake in attempting to keep the two fields separate?  And finally, from my own position in Comparative Race, Ethnic Studies, Postcolonial Studies, and Asian American/Native Am. Studies as part and parcel of the these fields under consideration: What are the particular parameters of inclusion within this bibliography given the context that these particular fields engage with dynamics, conditions, problematics loosely conceived of as engaged with discourses of the Global South?

List of Texts (In Progress):
Abrahams, Roger. The Man-of-Words in the West Indies: Performance and the Emergence of
Creole Culture.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1983. Print.
Adams, Rachel.  “The Worlding of American Studies.”  American Quarterly 53:4 (2001): 720-732.
---. “Hipsters and jipitecas: Literary Countercultures on Both Sides of the Border.”  American Literary History 16.1 (2004) 58-84.
            http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/american_literary_history/v016/16.1adams.html
            --(From FTE Proposal)
---. "At the Borders of American Crime Fiction." Shades of the Planet: American
Literature as World Literature. Eds. Dimock,Wai Chee (ed.and introd.) and Lawrence Buell. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, vi, 2007. 249-273. CSA.
---. "'Going to Canada': The Politics and Poetics of Northern Exodus." Yale Journal of Criticism:
Interpretation in the Humanities 18.2 (2005): 409-33. MLA International Bibliography.
---. "The Ends of America, the Ends of Postmodernism." Twentieth Century Literature: A
Scholarly and Critical Journal 53.3 (2007): 248-72. MLA International Bibliography.
---. "The Northern Borderlands and Latino Canadian Diaspora." Hemispheric American Studies.
Eds. Caroline F. (ed and introd ). Levander, Robert S. (ed and introd ). Levine, and Susan
(afterword) Gillman. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers UP, vii, 2008. 313-327. CSA.
Aboul-Ela, Hosam. "Global South, Local South: The New Postmodernism in U. S. Southern
Studies." American Literature: A Journal of Literary History, Criticism, and Bibliography 78.4 (2006): 847-58.
Anderson, Eric G. "Rethinking Indigenous Southern Communities." American Literature; a
Journal of Literary History, Criticism and Bibliography. 78.4 (2006): 730. Print.
http://americanliterature.dukejournals.org/cgi/reprint/78/4/730
Baker, Houston A. Turning South Again: Re-thinking Modernism/re-Reading Booker T. Durham:
Duke University Press, 2001. Print.
Baker, Houston and Dana Nelson, eds. “Violence, the Body and the South.”  American
Literature 73:2, June 2001.
            http://americanliterature.dukejournals.org/cgi/reprint/73/2/231
            --(From FTE Proposal)
Brown, Kimberly N. "Sniffing the "calypso Magnolia": Unearthing the Caribbean Presence in
the South (response)." South Central Review. 22.1 (2005): 81-86. Print http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/south_central_review/v022/22.1brown.html
--(Response to John Lowe .  Calls for incorporation of Caribbean and other ethnic influences within Southern aesthetic.)
Cobb, James C. and William Stueck, eds. Globalization and the American South. Athens: U of
Georgia Press, 2005.
Review Link: http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?vid=1&hid=17&sid=02282f932c0b-475694f9c0be51e0961e%40sessionmgr14&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=a9h&AN=31970636#db=a9h&AN=31970636
Cobb, James C. Redefining Southern Culture: Mind and Identity in the Modern South. Athens,
GA: University of Georgia Press, 1999. Print.
Cohn, Deborah. "U. S. Southern Studies and Latin American Studies: Windows Onto
Postcolonial Studies." American Literature: A Journal of Literary History, Criticism, and
Bibliography 78.4 (2006): 704-7.
---. History and Memory in the Two Souths: Recent Southern and Spanish
American Fiction.  Nashville, Tenn.: VanderbiltUP, 1999.
Cohn, Deborah N. and Jon Smith, eds. Look Away! The U.S. South in New World Studies. 
Durham, N.C.: Duke Univ. Press, 2004.
Cummings, Denise, Anne Goodwyn Jones and Jeff Rice, eds.  “Souths: Global and Local.”   
Southern Quarterly 4, Fall 2003.
            --(From FTE Proposal)
Dainotto, Roberto M.  Place in Literature: Regions, Cultures, Communities. Ithaca: Cornell UP,
2000.
Duck, Leigh A. The Nation's Region: Southern Modernism, Segregation, and U.s. Nationalism.
Athens, Ga: University of Georgia Press, 2006. Print.
Ford, Sarah Gilbreath. "Listening to the Ghosts: The 'New Southern Studies': A Response to
Michael Kreyling." South Central Review: The Journal of the South Central Modern Language Association 22.1 (2005): 19-25.
Fossett, Judith J, Adam Gussow, and Riche Richardson. "A Symposium: New Souths - Houston
A. Baker, Jr.'s Critical Memory and Turning South Again." The Mississippi Quarterly.
55.4 (2002): 569. Print. (on default relationship between race and “South”)
Francisco, Edward, Robert C. Vaughan, and Linda Francisco. The South in Perspective: An
Anthology of Southern Literature. Upper Saddle River, N.J: Prentice Hall, 2001. Print.
Glissant, Édouard, and J M. Dash. Caribbean Discourse: Selected Essays. CARAF books.
Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1989. Print.
Gray, Richard. Southern Aberrations: Writers of the American South and the Problems of
Regionalism. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State Univ. Press, 2000. Print.
Greeson, Jennifer R. "The Figure of the South and the Nationalizing Imperatives of Early United
States Literature."Yale Journal of Criticism. 12.2 (1999): 209-248. Print.
Helg, Aline.  “The Problem of Race in Cuba and the United States.”  The South and the
Caribbean. Eds. Douglass Sullivan-Gonzalez and Charles ReaganWilson.  Jackson:
Univ. Press of Mississippi, 2001.
Henninger, Katherine Renee. "How New? what Place?: Southern Studies and the Rest of the
World." Contemporary Literature 45.1 (2004): 177-85.
Heilman, Robert B. “The Southern Temper.” South: Modern Southern Literature in Its Cultural
Setting. Eds. Louis D. Rubin, Jr. and Robert D. Jacobs. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1961, 50.
Humphries, Jefferson, and John Lowe. The Future of Southern Letters. New York: Oxford
University Press, 1996. Print.
Hune, Shirley.  “Reflections on Linking Global South and Asian American Studies.”  Amerasia
Journal 35.5 (2009): (35-46).
Jones, Anne G, and Susan V. D. E. Donaldson. Haunted Bodies: Gender and Southern Texts.
The American South series. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1997. Print.
Jones, Suzanne W. and Sharon Monteith, eds. South to a New Place: Region, Literature, Culture.
Southern Literary Studies ser. Baton Rouge: Louisiana StateUniversity Press, 2002.
Joseph, Philip. American Literary Regionalism in a Global Age. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State
University Press, 2007. Print.
Kreyling, Edward. “Southern Literature: Consensus and Dissensus,” American Literature 60
(March 1988): 83–95
---. "Toward 'A New Southern Studies'." South Central Review: The Journal o
the South Central Modern Language Association 22.1 (2005): 4-18.
---. "Toward 'A New Southern Studies'." Mississippi Quarterly: The Journal of Southern
Cultures 54.3 (2001): 383-91.
Ladd, B. "Dismantling the Monolith: Southern Places - Past, Present, and Future." Critical
Survey. 12 (2000): 28-42. Print.
Lowe, John. ""Calypso Magnolia": the Caribbean Side of the South." South Central Review. 22.1
(2005): 54-80. Print.
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/south_central_review/v022/22.1lowe.html
---. "Reconstruction Revisited: Plantation School Writers, Postcolonial Theory, and
Confederates in Brazil."Mississippi Quarterly. 57.1 (2004): 5-26. Print.
Matthews, John T. "Recalling the West Indies: from Yoknapatawpha to Haiti and
Back." American Literary History. 16.2 (2004): 238-262. Print.
McPherson, Tara. "On Wal-Mart and Southern Studies." American Literature: A Journal of
Literary History, Criticism, and Bibliography 78.4 (2006): 695-8.
---. "Re-Imagining the Red States: New Directions for Southern Studies." Southern Spaces
(2004): (no pagination).
McHaney, Pearl and Thomas McHaney, eds.  “The Worldwide Face of Southern Literature.” 
South Atlantic Review 65, Autumn 2000.
http://links.jstor.org/stable/3201615?seq=2
--(From FTE Proposal)
McKee, Kathryn and Annette Trefzer, eds.  “Global Contexts, Local Literatures: The New  Southern Studies.” American Literature 78:4, December 2006.
            http://americanliterature.dukejournals.org/cgi/reprint/78/4/677
            --(From FTE Proposal)
McWhirter, David B. "Eudora Welty Goes to the Movies: Modernism, Regionalism, Global
Media." Mfs Modern Fiction Studies. 55.1 (2009): 68-91. Print.
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/modern_fiction_studies/v055/55.1.mcwhirter.html
McWhirter, David, ed.  “Rethinking Southern Literary Studies.”  South Central Review 22,
Spring 2005.
            --(From FTE Proposal)
O'Brien, Michael. Placing the South. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2007. Print.
Painter, Nell Irvin.  Southern History across the Color Line.  Chapel Hill: Univ. of North
Carolina Press, 2002.
Peacock, James and Carrie Mathews, eds.  The American South in a Global World.  Chapel Hill:
UNC Press, 2005.
            --(From FTE Proposal)
Peacock, James L. Grounded Globalism: How the U.S. South Embraces the World. Athens:
University of Georgia Press, 2007. Print.
Polet, Fracois, ed. The State of Resistance: Popular Struggles in the Global South. London: Zed
Books, 2007.
            --(From FTE Proposal)
Rodriguez, Ana P. "Refugees of the South: Central Americans in the U.s. Latino
Imaginary." American Literature. 73.2 (2001): 387-412. Print.
Romine, Scott.  The Real South: Southern Narrative in the Age of Cultural ReproductionBaton
Rouge, LA: Louisiana State UP, 2008.
--. “Where Is Southern Literature? The Practice of Place in a Postsouthern Age.”  Eds. Jones,
Suzanne W. (ed. and introd.); Monteith, Sharon (ed. and introd.); Gray, Richard
(foreword). 2002. South to a New Place: Region, Literature, Culture. (pp. 23-43). Baton
Rouge, LA: Louisiana State UP.
Rojo, Antonio Benitez.  The Repeating Island: The Caribbean and Postmodern Performance,
trans. James E. Maraniss.  Durham: Duke University Press, 1992.
Roach, Joseph R. Cities of the Dead: Circum-atlantic Performance. New York: Columbia
University Press, 1996. Print.
Saldivar, Jose. Dialectics of Our America: Genealogy, Cultural Critique and Literary History.
Durham: Duke University Press, 1991.
            --(From FTE Proposal)
Saldivar, Ramon.  “Looking for a Master Plan: Faulkner, Paredes, and the Colonial and
Postcolonial Subject.” The Cambridge Companion to Faulkner, ed. Philip M. Weinstein.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995
Smith, Jon, Kathryn McKee and Scott Romine, eds. “Postcolonial Theory, the U.S. South and
New World Studies.” Mississippi Quarterly 56, Fall 2003.
            --(From FTE Proposal)
Stecopoulos, Harry. Reconstructing the World: Southern Fictions and U.S. Imperialisms, 1898-
1976. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2008. Print.
Tindall, George Brown. Natives and Newcomers: Ethnic Southerners and Southern Ethnics.
Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1995.
Trefzer, Annette. "Possessing the Self: Caribbean Identities in Zora Neale Hurston's Tell My
Horse." African American Review. 34.2 (2000): 299-312. Print.
Wertheimer, Eric. Imagined Empires: Incas, Aztecs, and the New World of American Literature,
1771-1876. Cambridge studies in American literature and culture. Cambridge [England:
Cambridge University Press, 1999. Print.
Whisnant, David.  “The Next Phase of Cultural Work in the South, What We Have to Work
with,Where We Are Going.” Southern Folklore 49:3 (1992).
Winchell, Mark Royden. "Recent Southern Studies: From Romance to Ritual." Canadian Review
of American Studies/Revue Canadienne d'Etudes Americaines 16.1 (1985): 73-82.
Winders, Jamie L.  “(Re)working the U.S. South: Latino Migration and the Politics of Race and
Work in Nashville, Tennessee.” PhD diss., University of Kentucky, 2004.
Yaeger, Patricia. Dirt and Desire : Reconstructing Southern Women's Writing, 1930-1990.
Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000. Print.
Yousaf, Nahem and Sharon Monteith.  “Making an Impression: New Immigrant Fiction in the
Contemporary South.”  Rethinking the U.S.     South, a special issue of Modern Languages
Forum 40: 2 (2004): 214–24
Zinn, Howard. The Southern Mystique. New York: Knopf, 1964. Print

 

Preliminary Bibliography of Hemispheric (American) Studies
Bibliographic Narrative:
My entry into Hemispheric Studies as a critical turn of American Studies happened by way of exploring the theoretical and spatial shifts in Asian American Studies.  As an Asian Americanist approaching the field from a comparative race perspective, and particularly with reference to Indigenous communities of the Americas, this entry into Hemispheric Studies seemed a somewhat fluid transition that frames Asian American Studies’ transnational turn within the Western Hemisphere, the location from which Asian American/Immigrant contact and imaginations of Indigenous communities of the Americas is most prominent.  From this particular entry, my subsequent task of compiling texts that may fall under the category of Hemispheric American Studies provided me with crucial new insight into the anchoring concerns of the field and some of the new directions it seems to be taking.  Yet, situated as I am in a field that is predominantly marginalized in American Studies proper, I came to this bibliographic work with attention to the emerging problematics that such a reframing in American Studies carries with it. 
I first approached compiling the bibliography by simply typing manifestations of the keyword “Hemispheric” into the library database.  I figured that this will lead me to some more recent articles that will direct me to older articles/books that have thus far informed the current dialogues in the field.  The search brought up several interesting articles.  Three such pieces I will talk about in further detail: Ralph Bauer’s Hemispheric Studies, Levander and Levine’s introduction to the anthology Hemispheric American Studies, and Janice Radway’s ASA Presidential Speech.  Each of these pieces contained overlapping concerns and carried with them similar problematics.  I relied heavily on Ralph Bauer’s piece in my construction of the bibliography, as his work had the most lengthy and thorough citation of works.  He also categorized the works into relevant sub-fields, which I loosly gesture to in the bibliography.  These categories are changeable and could be added on to or reworked if deemed necessary. 
Both Bauer and Levander & Levine cite Radway’s speech as a watershed moment in leading American Studies towards a Hemispheric frame of reference.  In her speech to the Association of American Studies, Radway calls for the field to move away from a positivist construction of the nation and national identity to one that specifies differences and contingencies in the making (and re-making) of nation.  For Radway, this notion of nation as process necessitates a recognition of how the U.S. nation and its diverse inhabitants are constituted by internal (racial) processes.  At the same time as we focus on this, Radway ask that we consider how nations, communities, cultures, and identities are constructed by their relationality.  This has serious implications for a field that has de facto defined its “objects” within the boundaries of the U.S. nation. 
In reading some of the major anthology introductions, articles, and essays that attempt to define the theoretical and political contours of this emerging field I found some overlapping features.   Foundationally, Hemispheric Studies reads ‘Nation’ not as a preconceived autonomous entity but, rather, a constructed concept and thereby malleable in its contingency to intersecting, competing, overlapping spatio-temporal imaginations.  It examines and registers cultural experiences as inflected by the materiality of these spatio-temporal imaginations, of which the nation plays a significant though not sole part. And furthermore, it seems to highlights race as an organizing rubric for the process of these imaginations.  Therein lies what seems to be a central political component of the field (although I would not declare this a whole-sale criterion that all scholars have taken up): Hemispheric Studies broaches a critique of U.S. exceptionalism and recognition of the imperial gesture contained in the co-optation of the term ‘America’ as a stand- in for the U.S. 

As such, Hemispheric Studies invokes discussions being forged in fields such as Latin American/Inter-American Studies, Ethnic/Critical Race Studies, and Postcolonial Studies.  For Radway, “the complex, increasingly elaborated and refined discussion of the social, political, cultural, and intellectual consequences of both internal and external forms of U.S. imperialism has begun to demand new ways of thinking the relationship among geography, culture, and identity.  [Radway] believe[s] that this work of reconceptualization should now be placed at the heart of the field’s agenda and that the association should itself seek ways to foster it through every means possible” (7).”  For one, the work of scholars who focus on the U.S. practices of exclusion as that which provides its coherency offers groundwork for a necessary transformation of the field from a positivist construction of the nation and national identity to one that specifies differences and contingencies in the marking (and re-marking) of identity.  In addition, work emerging out of Chicana/o Studies and Pacific Rim Studies and its focus on recalibrating the relationship between cultural identity to national geographies can bring to light the discrepancies between the idea of a culture as essentially attached to a concrete geopolitical boundary and the realities of cultural life as marked and consistently changed by the powers operating through the acts of boundary making and/or erasing.

Interestingly, despite the political grounding posited by Radway and others, Hemispheric Studies seems to be in overlapping contentious relationship with Latin American and Inter-American Studies.  The domain of Latin American Studies has consistently looked beyond the nation and in critical opposition to the United States as general basis for its field of study.  As such, scholars within its domain have issued very real concerns for the ways in which the Hemispheric may in fact iterate a U.S. academic imperialism that enacts the very power relations that it simultaneously attempts to dispel.  Bauer cites Sophia McClennen’s critique of Radway in order to elucidate this charge: “Radway’s proposition assumes that inter-American Studies does not already exist, that it is a field available for exploration and development and that members of the American Studies Association could simply rename themselves inter-Americanists…. What would an inter-American studies housed in English and History department in the United States and taught by monolingual faculty be, if not an example of US intellectual expansionism?” (Bauer citing McClennen, 237).  In what seems to be an indirect response to McClennen’s charge, Levander & Levine suggest that Hemispheric Studies can potentially avoid the trappings of the older models of Area Studies in ways that can disrupt power asymmetries.  Although Area Studies in its general sense tends to take the geographic boundaries of the nation (and the histories it contains within) as a given, Levander and Levine recognize how strands of Latin American Studies have “organized around rubrics other than the nation.  Border studies, for example, have focused on the particular locales that spring up at the crossroads of national cultures” (6).  Levander & Levine seem to read these particular approaches to the nation as simply the opposite side of the binary of nation/not nation which, they suggest, ironically consolidates the preeminence of the nation-state.  They posit Hemispheric Studies as potentially dismantling these binaries in its confrontation with the materiality of the nation and yet with a necessary “recognition of the processes through which nations are embedded in and develop gradually out of local and transnational circumstances.  In short, by attending to multiple and sometimes competing conceptions of geography and chronology, [they recognize the hemispheric approach as illuminating how] the idea of a national literature and culture emerges out of a series of subordinations, alliances, and cross-fertilizations that make the nation a richly suggestive but hardly autonomous entity” (6).  As Levander and Levine read Latin American Studies as perhaps too easily eliding the work of the nation, Bauer seemingly contradictorily reads this very field as upholding the solidity of national boundaries.  He writes that Latin Americanists critique Hemispheric Studies’ impulse as part and parcel of the U.S.’s (and its scholars’) need to do away with the Nation at the very moment that Nation itself can be a form of ultimate protection against neo-imperial encroachment.

Such unclear delineations between Hemispheric Studies and Latin American Studies proved a major challenge for me as I compiled the bibliography.  I stopped to ask myself, often, whether compiling a set of work in Hemispheric Studies necessitates inclusion of all works stemming from Latin American and Inter-American Studies? And, for that matter, Chicana/o Studies?  Where does the line get drawn, and what are the implications of drawing the line in one place and not another?  In addition, deeply situated as I am in Ethnic/ Comparative Race Studies, I recognized how the theoretical anchorings in Hemispheric American Studies are being articulated in multiple manifestations in fields such as Indigenous/Native American Studies.  For instance, Hemispheric Studies’ interrogation of national boundaries and focus on multiple processes of spatialization as important to constructions of cultural identity has been a major focus of Indigenous/Native American critical work.  In fact, although Bauer rightfully recognizes the invocation of nationalism in Native American claims of sovereignty, its very contention within the field itself bespeaks this kind of active dismantling of nation as an a priori condition.  Because of this, I continued to ask: might I include most if not all critical works in Indigenous / Native American Studies?  And if I do not, what are the power implications of that decision? 
In that light, the bibliography that follows does not pretend to be exhaustive.  It feels more like an entry point, a whisper of a suggestion of the path we might go.  Yet, there should also be this acknowledgement that certain paths have already been treaded, and called other names.  To not acknowledge (and pay due respect) would be to fully miss the potential of Hemispheric American Studies.  

List of Texts (In Progress):
Adams, Rachel. “The Northern Borderlands and Latino Canadian Diaspora.” Levander and
Levine, Hemi­spheric American Studies 313–27.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
Andrews, Jennifer, and Priscilla L. Walton. “Rethinking Canadian and American Nationality:
Indigeneity and the 49th Parallel in Thomas King.” American Literary History 18.3
(2006): 600–17. Print.
--Native American Studies
Aldridge, Alfred Owen. Early American Literature. A Comparativist Approach. Princeton:
Princeton UP, 1982. Print.
--Hemispheric Literary Studies (1990s and before)
Alemán, Jesse. “The Other Country: Mexico, the United States, and the Gothic History of
Conquest.” Levander and Levine, Hemispheric American Studies 75–95.
--Early Republic and 19th Century
Barrenechea, Antonio. “Good Neighbor / Bad Neighbor: Boltonian Americanism and
Hemispheric Studies.” Comparative Literature. Forthcoming. Print.
———. “Salvaging Melville’s America: Baroque Revision in Terra Nostra.” America’s Worlds
and the World’s Americas / Les mondes des Amériques et les Amériques du monde. Ed.
Amaryll Chanady, George Handley, and Patrick Imbert. Ottawa: Legas, 2006. 465–73.
Print. Americas Ser. 5.
--Latin American and Inter-American Studies
Bauer, Ralph. “Colonial Discourse and Early American Literary History: Ercilla, the Inca
Garcilaso, and Joel Barlow’s Conception of a New World Epic.” Early American Literature 30.3 (1995): 203–32. Print.
———. The Cultural Geography of Colonial American Literatures: Empire, Travel, Modernity.
Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2003. Print.
———. “The Hemispheric Genealogies of ‘Race’: Creoliza­tion and the Cultural Geography of
Colonial Dif­ference across the Eighteenth-Century Americas.” Levander and Levine,
Hemispheric American Studies 36–56.
———. “Notes on the Comparative Study of the Colonial Americas: Further Reflections on the
Tucson Summit.”
--Colonial Period
Bauer, Ralph, and José Antonio Mazzotti, eds. Creole Subjects: The Ambiguous Coloniality of
Early Ameri­can Literatures. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P; Williamsburg:
Omohundro Inst. of Early Amer. Hist. and Culture, forthcoming. Print.
———. “Colonial Discourse and Early American Literary History: Ercilla, the Inca Garcilaso,
and Joel Barlow’s Conception of a New World Epic.” Early American Literature 30.3 (1995): 203–32. Print.
--Colonial Period
Bauer, Ralph. "The Changing Profession - Hemispheric Studies." Publications of the Modern
Language Association of America. 124.1 (2009): 234. Print.
--Defining Contours of the Field
Ballón, José. Autonomía cultural americana: Emerson y Martí. Madrid: Pliegos, 1986. Print.
--Hemispheric Literary Studies (1990s and before)
Belnap, Jeffrey, and Raúl Fernández, eds. José Martí’s “Our America”: From National to
Hemispheric Cultural Studies. Durham: Duke UP, 1998. Print.
--On Jose Marti
Benitez Benítez Rojo, Antonio. La isla que se repite: El Caríbe y la perspectiva posmoderna.
Hanover: Norte, 1989. Print. Trans. as The Repeating Island: The Caribbean and the
Postmodern Perspective. Trans. James Maraniss. Dur­ham: Duke UP, 1992.
--Hemispheric Literary Studies (1990s “Comparative Inter-American Scholarship)
Benítez, Rojo A. The Repeating Island: The Caribbean and the Postmodern Perspective. Post-
contemporary interventions. Durham: Duke University Press, 1992. Print.
--Caribbean Studies /Theories of Creolization
Bolton, Herber Eugene. “The Epic of Greater America.” American Historical Review 38.3
(1933): 448–74. Print.
--Hemispheric History (1990s and Before)
Boruchoff, David. “New Spain, New England, and the New Jerusalem: The ‘Translation’ of
Empire, Faith, and Learning (Translatio Imperii, Fidei ac Scientiae) in the Colonial
Missionary Project.” Early American Literature 43.1 (2008): 5–34. Print.
--Latin American and Inter-American Studies
Bost, Suzanne. "Doing the Hemisphere Differently: a Response to Ralph Bauer." American
Literary History. 22.2 (2010): 266-270. Print.
--Defining Contours of the Field
Braziel, Jana Evans. “Trans-American Constructions of Black Masculinity.” Callaloo 26.3
(2003): 867–900. Print.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
-- in dialogue with African American Literatures
Brickhouse, Anna. “Hemispheric Jamestown.” Levander and Levine, Hemispheric American
Studies 36–56.
--Colonial Period
Brickhouse, Anna.  Transamerican Literary Relations and the Nineteenth-Century Public
Sphere. Cambridge: Cam­bridge UP, 2004. Print.
--Early Republic and 19th Century
Brotherston, Gordon. Book of the Fourth World: Reading the Native Americas through Their
Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1992. Print.
--Native American Studies
Castillo, Debra. Redreaming America: Toward a Bilin­gual American Culture.
Albany: State U of New York P, 2005. Print. SUNY Ser. in Latin Amer. and Iberian
Thought and Culture.
--20th Century
Castillo, Susan. Performing America: Colonial Encounters in New World Writing, 1500–1786.
London: Rout­ledge, 2005. Print.
--Colonial Period
Cañizares-Esguerra, Jorge. How to Write the History of the New World: Histories,
Epistemologies, and Identi­ties in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World. Stan­ford:
Stanford UP, 2001. Print.
———. Puritan Conquistadors: Iberianizing the Atlantic, 1550–1700. Stanford: Stanford UP,
2006. Print.
--Latin American and Inter-American Studies
Cañizares-Esguerra, Jorge, and Erik Seeman, eds. The Atlantic in Global History, 1500–2000.
Upper Saddle River: Prentice, 2006. Print.
            --Race and Ethnic Studies
-- in dialogue with African American Literatures
Chevigny, Bell Gale, and Gari Laguardia, eds. Reinvent­ing America: Comparative Studies of the
Literature of the United States and Spanish America. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1986.
Print.
--Hemispheric Literary Studies (1990s and before)
Chuh, Kandice. “Of Hemispheres and Other Spheres: Navigating Karen Tei Yamashita’s
Literary World.” American Literary History 18.3 (2006): 618–37. Print.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
--In Dialogue with Asian American Literature
Cohn, Deborah. History and Memory of the Two Souths: Recent Southern and Spanish American
Fiction. Nash­ville: Vanderbilt UP, 1999. Print.
--Regional
Cox, Timothy. Postmodern Tales of Slavery in the Ameri­cas: From Alejo Carpentier to Charles
Johnson. New York: Garland, 2001. Print.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
-- in dialogue with African American Literatures
Dash, Michael. The Other America: Caribbean Literature in a New World Context.
Charlottesville: UP of Virginia, 1998. Print.
--Caribbean Studies /Theories of Creolization
DeGuzman, Maria. Spain’s Long Shadow: The Black Leg­end, Off-Whiteness, and Anglo-
American Empire. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 2005. Print.
--Early Republic and 19th Century
--Postcolonial Approach
Delgado, Celeste F, and José E. Muñoz. Everynight Life: Culture and Dance in Latin/o America.
Latin America otherwise. Durham: Duke University Press, 1997. Print.
--Latin American and Inter-American Studies
Delgadillo, Theresa. “Singing ‘Angelitos Negros’: African Diaspora Meets Mestizaje in the
Americas.” Ameri­can Quarterly 58.2 (2006): 407–30, 552. Print.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
-- in dialogue with African American Literatures
Denning, Michael. The Cultural Front: The Laboring of American Culture in the Twentieth
Century. London: Verso, 1998. Print.

Desmond, Jane C, and Virginia R. Domínguez. "Resituating American Studies in a Critical
Internationalism." American Quarterly. 48.3 (1996). Print.
--Defining Contours of the Field
Douglass, Mike and Glenda S. Roberts, eds. Japan and Global Migration: Foreigh Workers and
the Advent of a Multicultural Society (New York: Routledge, 2000)
--Race and Ethnic Studies
--In Dialogue with Asian American Literature
Dunkerley, James. Americana: The Americas in the World around 1850. London: Verso, 2000.
Print.
--Early Republic and 19th Century
Dubois, Laurent. A Colony of Citizens: Revolution and Slave Emancipation in the French
Caribbean, 1787-1804. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004. Print.
--Caribbean Studies /Theories of Creolization

Elliott, John H. Empires of the Atlantic World: Britain and Spain in America, 1492–1830. New
Haven: Yale UP, 2006. Print.
--History
--20th C
Ette, Ottmar, and Friederike Pannewick, eds. Arab Americas: Literary Entanglements of the
American Hemisphere and the Arab World. Frankfurt am Main: Vervuert; Madrid:
Iberoamericana, 2006. Print.
--Arab Americans and Muslims
Festa, Lynn.  Sentimental Figures of Empire in Eighteenth-Century Britain and France. 
Baltimore: John Hopkins UP, 2006.  Print.
--Renaissance and Eighteenth-Century Studies (“an increasing interest in the archives of the empire and the extra-European Colonial World” (Bauer, 244)
Fernández-Armesto, Felipe. The Americas: A Hemispheric History. New
York: Mod. Lib., 2003. Print.
--History
--20th C
Fernández Retamar, Roberto. Calibán: Apuntes sobre la cultura en nuestra América. México:
Diógenes, 1971. Print.
--Latin American and Inter-American Studies
Firmat, Gustavo. “Cheek to Cheek.” Introduction. Pérez-Firmat, Do the Americas 1–6.
———, ed. Do the Americas Have a Common Literature? Durham: Duke UP, 1990. Print.
———.  Next Year in Cuba: A Cubano's Coming-of-Age in America. New York: Anchor Books,
1995. Print.
--Hemispheric Literary Studies (1990s and before)
Fitz, Earl.  “Inter-American Studies as an Emerging Field: The Future of a Discipline.”
Rethinking the Americas: Crossing Borders and Disciplines. Ed. Cathy L. Jrade. Spec. issue of Venderbilt E-Journal of Luso-Hispanic Studies 1 (2004): 13-28. Web. 30 Oct. 2008.
--Key Shift in Field: “Hemispheric Turn”
Fitz. Earl.  “Old World Roots / New World Realities: A Com­paratist Looks at the Growth of
Literature in North and South America.” Council on National Literatures / Quarterly
World Report 3.3 (1980): 8–11. Print.
--Hemispheric Literary Studies (1990s and before)
Fitz, Earl. Rediscovering the New World: Inter-American Literature in a Comparative Context.
Iowa City: U of Iowa P, 1991. Print.
--Hemispheric Literary Studies (1990s “Comparative Inter-American Scholarship)
Fitz, Earl, and Sophia McClennen, eds. Comparative Cul­tural Studies and Latin America. West
Lafayette: Pur­due UP, 2004. Print.
--20th Century
Fox, Claire F. “The Hemispheric Routes of ‘El Nuevo Arte Nue­stro’: The Pan American Union,
Cultural Policy, and the Cold War.” Levander and Levine, Hemispheric American Studies
223–48.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
--In dialogue with Chicana/o Studies

Fuchs, Barbara.  Mimesis and Empire: The New World, Islam, and European Identities
Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001. Print
--Renaissance and Eighteenth-Century Studies (“an increasing interest in the archives of the empire and the extra-European Colonial World” (Bauer, 244)
Galinsky Galinsky, Hans. “Exploring the ‘Exploration Report’ and Its Image of the Overseas
World: Spanish, French, and English Variants of a Common Form Type in Early
American Literature.” Early American Literature 12.1 (1977): 5–24. Print.
———. “Kolonialer Literaturbarock in Virginia: Eine In­terpretation von ‘Bacon’s Epitaph’ auf
der Grundlage eines Forschungsberichtes.” Amerika und Europa. Sprachliche und
Sprachkünstlerische Wechselbezie­hungen in amerikanistischer Sicht. Ed. Hans Galinsky.
Berlin: Langenscheidt, 1968. Print.
--European precedence (1990s and Before)
Gerbi, Antonello. La disputa del nuovo mondo: Storia di una polemica, 1750–1900. Milan:
Ricardo Ricciardi, 1955. Print. Trans. as The Dispute of the New World: The History of a
Polemic, 1750–1900. Trans. Jeremy Moyle. Pittsburgh: U of Pittsburgh P, 1973.
--European precedence (1990s and Before)
Giles, Paul. “Commentary: Hemispheric Partiality.” American Literary History 18.3 (2006):
648–55. Print.
--Defining Contours of the Field
Goellnicht, Donald. “Of Bones and Suicide: Sky Lee’s Disappearing Moon Café and Fae
Myenne Ng’s Bone.” Modern Fiction Studies 46.2 (2000): 300–30. Print.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
--In Dialogue with Asian American Literature
            --Canada
Goudie, Sean. Creole America: The West Indies and the Formation of Literature and Culture in
the New Repub­lic. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 2006. Print. (Theories of Creolization)
--Early Republic and 19th Century
Green, Roland.  Unrequited Conquests: Love and Empire in the Colonial Americas.  Chicago: U
of Chicago P, 1999.  Print.
--. “Wanted: A New World Studies.”  American Literary History 12.1-2 (2000): 337-47.  Print.
--Renaissance and Eighteenth-Century Studies (“an increasing interest in the archives of the empire and the extra-European Colonial World” (Bauer, 244)
Greenblatt, Stephen.  Marvelous Possessions: The Wonder of the New World.  Chicago: U of
Chicago P, 1991. Print.
--Renaissance and Eighteenth-Century Studies (“an increasing interest in the archives of the empire and the extra-European Colonial World” (Bauer, 244)
Greeson, Jennifer Rae. “Expropriating The Great South and Exporting ‘Local Color’: Global and
Hemispheric Imaginaries of the First Reconstruction.” Levander and Levine, Hemispheric American Studies 116–39.
--Regional
Gruesz, Kirsten. Ambassadors of Culture: The Transamer­ican Origins of Latino Writing.
Princeton: Princeton UP, 2002. Print.
--Early Republic and 19th Century
            --Race and Ethnic Studies
            --In dialogue with Chicana/o Studies
            --Inter-American
Handley, George. Postslavery Literature in the Americas. Charlottesville: U of Virginia P, 2000.
Print.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
-- in dialogue with African American Literatures
Hanke, Lewis, ed. Do the Americas Have a Common History? A Critique of the Bolton Theory.
New York: Knopf, 1964. Print.
--Hemispheric History (1990s and Before)
Heide, Markus. “Ambivalent Vistas: José Martí’s ‘Our America,’ Nineteenth-Century Pan-
Americanism and Hemispheric American Studies.” (Anti-)Americanisms. Ed. Michael
Draxlbauer, Astrid Fellner, and Thomas Fröschl. Wien: Lit, 2004. 89–105. Print.
--On Jose Marti
Hill, Ruth. “Between Black and White: A Critical Race Theory Approach to Caste Poetry in the
Spanish New World.” Comparative Literature 59.4 (2007): 269–93. Print. (Critique of Postcolonial rubrics in Latin American Contexts)
--Latin American and Inter-American Studies
Hirabayashi, Lane Ryo, Akemi Kikumura-Yano, and James A. Hirabayashi, eds.  New Worlds,
New Lives: Globalization and People of Japanese Descent in the Americas and from
Latin America in Japan.  Palo Alto: Stanford UP, 2002.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
--In Dialogue with Asian American Literature
Hiraldo, Carlos. Segregated Miscegenation: On the Treatment of Racial Hybridity in the U.S.
and Latin American Literary Traditions. New York: Routledge, 2003. Print.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
Hu-DeHart, Evelyn. Across the Pacific: Asian Americans and Globalization. Philadelphia:
Temple UP, 1999. Print.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
--In Dialogue with Asian American Literature
Hune, Shirley.  “Reflections on Linking Global South and Asian American Studies.”  Amerasia
Journal 35.5 (2009): (35-46).
--Race and Ethnic Studies
--In Dialogue with Asian American Literature
Hunt, Alfred N. Haiti's Influence on Antebellum America: Slumbering Volcano in the Caribbean.
Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1988. Print.
--Caribbean Studies /Theories of Creolization
Kaplan, Amy. The Anarchy of Empire in the Making of U.S. Culture. Cambridge: Harvard UP,
2005. Print. (Postcolonial Approach)
--Early Republic and 19th Century
--Postcolonial Approach
Kaplan, Amy, and Donald Pease, eds. Cultures of the United States Imperialism. Durham: Duke
UP, 1993. Print.
--Early Republic and 19th Century
--Postcolonial Approach
Kadir, Djelal. Columbus and the Ends of the Earth: Europe’s Pro­phetic Rhetoric as Conquering
Ideology. Berkeley: U of California P, 1992. Print.
--Hemispheric Literary Studies (1990s “Comparative Inter-American Scholarship)
Kaul, Suvir.  Poems of Nation, Anthems of Empire: English Verse in the Long Eighteenth
Century.  Charlottesville: UP of Virginia, 2000.  Print.
--Renaissance and Eighteenth-Century Studies (“an increasing interest in the archives of the empire and the extra-European Colonial World” (Bauer, 244)
Kaup, Monika. “The Neobaroque in Djuna Barnes.” Modernism/ modernity 12.1 (2005): 85–110.
Print.         
———. “‘Our America’ That Is Not One: Transnational Black Atlantic Disclosures in Nicolás
Guillén and Langston Hughes.” Discourse 22.3 (2000): 87–113. Print.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
-- in dialogue with African American Literatures
Kaup, Monika, and Debra Rosenthal. Introduction. Mix­ing Race, Mixing Culture: Inter-
American Literary Di­alogues. Ed. Kaup and Rosenthal. Austin: U of Texas P, 2002. xi–
xxix. Print. (Creolization, Caribbean Studies, Inter-American Studies)
--Race and Ethnic Studies
-- in dialogue with African American Literatures
Kazanjian, David. The Colonizing Trick: National Culture and Imperial Citizenship in Early
America. Minneap­olis: U of Minnesota P, 2003. Print.
--Early Republic and 19th Century
--Postcolonial Approach
Klor de Alva, Jorge. “Colonialism and Postcolonialism as (Latin) American Mirages.” Colonial
Latin American Review 1.1–2 (1992): 3–23. Print (Critique of Postcolonial rubrics in Latina American Contexts)
--Latin American and Inter-American Studies
Kunimoto, Iyo.  “Japanese Migration to Latin America.”  In Japan, the United States, and Latin
America: Toward a Trilateral Relationship in the Western Hemisphere.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
--In Dialogue with Asian American Literature
Kutzinsky, Vera. Kutzinski, Vera. Against the American Grain: Myth and His­tory in William
Carlos Williams, Jay Wright, and Nicolás Guillén. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1987.
Print.
----Hemispheric Literary Studies (1990s and before)
———. “Fearful Asymmetries: Langston Hughes, Nicolás Guillén, and Cuba Libre.” Diacritics:
A Review of Con­temporary Criticism 34.3 (2004): 112–38. Print.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
-- in dialogue with African American Literatures
Langley, Lester. America and the Americas: The United States in the Western Hemisphere.
Athens: U of Geor­gia P, 1989. Print.
———. The Americas in the Age of Revolution, 1750–1850. New Haven: Yale UP, 1997. Print.
-- Hemispheric History (1990s “Comparative cultural and sociopolitical histories”)
Lee, Rachel. The Americas of Asian American Literature: Gendered Fictions of Nation and
Transnation. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1999. Print.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
--In Dialogue with Asian American Literature
Lesser, Jeffrey. Ed.  Searching for Home Abroad: Japanese Brazilians and Transnationalism.
Durham and London: Duke UP, 2003.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
--In Dialogue with Asian American Literature
Lazo, Rodrigo. “‘La Famosa Filadelfia’: The Hemispheric American City and Constitutional
Debates.” Levander and Levine, Hemispheric American Studies 57–74.
———. Writing to Cuba: Filibustering and Cuban Exiles in the United States. Chapel Hill: U of
North Carolina P, 2005. Print.
--Early Republic and 19th Century
--Inter-American
Levine, Robert. Dislocating Race and Nation: Episodes in Nineteenth-Century American
Literary Nationalism. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P, 2008. Print.
--Early Republic and 19th Century
Lezama Lima, José. La expresión americana. 1959. Santiago: Universitaria, 1969. Print
            --Latin American and Inter-American Studies
Linger, Daniel Touro.  No One Home: Brazilian Selves Remade in Japan.  Palo Alto: Stanford
UP, 2001.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
--In Dialogue with Asian American Literature
Madureira, Luís. Cannibal Modernities: Postcoloniality and the Avant-garde in Caribbean and
Brazilian Lit­erature. Charlottesville: U of Virginia P, 2005. Print.
--20th Century
Marr, Timothy. “‘Out of This World’: Islamic Irruptions in the Literary Americas.” Levander
and Levine, Hemispheric American Studies 266–93.
--Arab Americans and Muslims
Martí, Oscar R. “Jose Martí and the Heroic Image.” Belnap and Fernández 317–38.
            --On Jose Marti
Masterson, Daniel M., and Ssyaka Funada-Classen.  The Japanese in Latin America.  Urbana: U
of Illinois P, 2004.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
--In Dialogue with Asian American Literature
Mautner-Wasserman, Renata. Exotic Nations: Literature and Cultural Identity in the United
States and Brazil, 1830–1930. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1994. Print.
--Hemispheric Literary Studies (1990s “Comparative Inter-American Scholarship)
McClennen, Sophia. “Area Studies Beyond Ontology: Notes on Latin American Studies,
American Studies, and Inter-American Studies.” A contracorriente 5.1 (2007): 173–84. Print. (Latin / Inter- American Studies)
———. “Inter-American Studies or Imperial American Studies?” Comparative American
Studies 3.4 (2005): 393–413. Print (Latin / Inter- American Studies)
--Defining Contours of the Field
McKee Irwin, Robert. “Memín Pinguín, Rumba, and Racism: Afro-Mexicans in Classic Comics
and Film.” Levander and Levine, Hemispheric American Studies 249–65.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
-- in dialogue with African American Literatures
McLeod, Bruce.  The Geography of Empire in English Literature, 1580-1745.  Cambridge:
Cambridge UP, 1999.  Print.
--Renaissance and Eighteenth-Century Studies (“an increasing interest in the archives of the empire and the extra-European Colonial World” (Bauer, 244)
Merrim, Stephanie. Early Modern Women’s Writing and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Nashville:
Vanderbilt UP, 1999. Print.
--Latin American and Inter-American Studies
Mignolo, Walter. The Darker Side of the Renaissance: Literacy, Territoriality, and Colonization.
Ann Arbor: U of Michigan P, 1995. Print.
———. The Idea of Latin America. Oxford: Blackwell, 2005. Print.
———. Local Histories / Global Designs: Coloniality, Subaltern Knowledges, and Border
Thinking. Princeton: Princeton UP, 2000. Print.
--Latin American and Inter-American Studies
Murphy, Gretchen. Hemispheric Imaginings: The Mon­roe Doctrine and Narratives of U.S.
Empire. Durham: Duke UP, 2005. Print. (Postcolonial Approach).
--Early Republic and 19th Century
Muthyala, John. Reworlding America: Myth, History, and Narrative. Athens: Ohio UP, 2006.
Print. (Postcolonial; Creolization)
--On Jose Marti
--20th Century
Nichols, Roger. Indians in the United States and Canada: A Comparative History. Lincoln: U of
Nebraska P, 1998. Print.
--Native American Studies
Nunes, Zita. Cannibal Democracy: Race and Representa­tion in the Literature of the Americas.
Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 2008. Print.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
-- in dialogue with African American Literatures
Nwankwo, Ifeoma C. K. Black Cosmopolitanism: Ra­cial Consciousness and Transnational
Identity in the Nineteenth-Century Americas. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 2005.
Print.
———. “The Promises and Perils of US African Ameri­can Hemispherism: Latin America in
Martin Dela­ny’s Blake and Gayl Jones’s Mosquito.” Levander and Levine, Hemispheric
American Studies 187–205.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
-- in dialogue with African American Literatures
O’Gorman, Edmundo. “Do the Americas Have a Common History?” Do the Americas Have a
Common History? A Critique of the Bolton Theory. Ed. Lewis Hanke. New York: Knopf,
1964. 103–11. Print.
———. The Invention of America. 1958. Westport: Greenwood, 1972. Print.
            --Latin American and Inter-American Studies
Ong, Aihwa. Flexible Citizenship: The Cultural Logics of Transnationality. Durham: Duke UP,
1999. Print.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
--In Dialogue with Asian American Literature
Parrish, Susan Scott. “The ‘Hemispheric Turn’ in Colo­nial American Studies.” Early American
Literature 40.3 (2005): 545–53. Print.
--Colonial Period
Price, John. Native Studies: American and Canadian Indians. Toronto: McGraw, 1978. Print.
--Native American Studies
Porter, Carolyn. "What We Know That We Don't Know: Remapping American Literary
Studies." American Literary History. 6.3 (1994): 467-526. Print.
--Defining Contours of the Field
Pratt Guterl, Matthew. “An American Mediterranean: Haiti, Cuba, and the American South.”
Levander and Levine, Hemispheric American Studies 96–115.
--Regional
Radway, Janice. “What’s in a Name?” American Quarterly 51.1 (1999): 1–32. Print.
--Key Shift in field (1990s): Hemispheric Turn in American Studies
Renda, Mary A. Taking Haiti: Military Occupation and the Culture of U.s. Imperialism, 1915-
1940. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2001. Print.
--Caribbean Studies /Theories of Creolization
Rodó, José Enrique. Ariel. 1900. Ed. Gordon Brotherston. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1967.
Print.
--Latin American and Inter-American Studies
Rowe, John C. Literary Culture and U.S. Imperialism: From the Revolution to World War II.
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. Print.
Rowe, John C. Post-nationalist American Studies. Berkeley, Calif: University of California
Press, 2000. Print.
Roach, Joseph.  Cities of the Dead: Circum-Atlantic Performance.  New York: Columbia UP,
1967.  Print.
--Renaissance and Eighteenth-Century Studies (“an increasing interest in the archives of the empire and the extra-European Colonial World” (Bauer, 244)
Sadowski-Smith, Claudia, and Claire F. Fox.  “Theorizing the Hemisphere: Inter-Americas Work
at the Intersection of American, Canadian, and Latin American Studies.” Comparative American Studies 4.1. (2004): 5-38.  Print.
--Canada
--Inter-American Studies
Saldívar, José David. The Dialectics of Our America: Ge­nealogy, Cultural Critique, and Literary
History. Dur­ham: Duke UP, 1991. Print.
--Key Shift in field (1990s): Hemispheric Turn in American Studies
Salvatore, Ricardo Donato, Gilbert M. Joseph, Catherine C. LeGrand, eds. Close Encounters of
Empire: Writing the Cultural History of U.S.-Latin American Relations. Fwd. Fernando
Coronil. Durham: Duke UP, 1998. Print.
-- Hemispheric History (1990s “Comparative cultural and sociopolitical histories”)
Sayre, Gordon.  Les Sauvages Américains: Representations of Native Americans in French and
English Colonial Literature. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P, 1997. Print.
--Hemispheric Literary Studies (1990s “Comparative Inter-American Scholarship)
Sayre, Gordon. The Indian Chief as Tragic Hero: Native Resistance and the Literatures of
America, from Moctezuma to Tecumseh. Chapel Hill: U of North Caro­lina P, 2006. Print.
--Colonial Period
Smith, Jon, and Deborah Cohn. Look Away! The U.S. South in New World Studies. Durham:
Duke UP, 2004. Print.
--Regional
Sommer, Doris. Proceed with Caution, When Engaged by Minority Writings in the Americas.
Cambridge: Har­vard UP, 1999. Print.
--Hemispheric Literary Studies (1990s “Comparative Inter-American Scholarship)
Spillers, Hortense. Comparative American Identities. New York: Routledge, 1991. Print.
--Key Shift in field (1990s): Hemispheric Turn in American Studies
Stephens, Michelle. “‘I’m the Everybody Who’s Nobody’: Genealogies of the New World Slave
in Paul Robeson’s Performances of the 1930s.” Levander and Levine, Hemispheric
American Studies 166–86.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
-- in dialogue with African American Literatures
Streeby, Shelly. American Sensations: Class, Empire, and the Production of Popular Culture.
Berkeley: U of California P, 2002. Print. (Postcolonial Approach)
--Early Republic and 19th Century
Sullivan, Tom. Cowboys and Caudillos: Frontier Ideology of the Americas. Bowling Green:
Bowling Green State U Popular P, 1990. Print.
-- Hemispheric History (1990s “Comparative cultural and sociopolitical histories”)
Tace, Hedrick. Mulattas and Mestizas: Representing Mixed Identities in the Americas, 1850–
2000. , 2006. Internet resource.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
Taylor, Diana. The Archive and the Repertoire: Performing Cultural Memory in the Americas.
Durham: Duke UP, 2003. Print.
--20th Century
Tsuchida, Nobuya.  “The Japanese in Brazil, 1908-1941.” Ph.D. diss., University of California,
Los Angeles.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
--In Dialogue with Asian American Literature
Valdés, M. J., ed. Inter-American Literary Relations. Proc. of the Xth Cong. of the Intl. Compar.
Lit. Assn. New York: Garland, 1985. Print.
--Hemispheric Literary Studies (1990s and before)
Véliz, Claudio. The New World of the Gothic Fox: Culture and Economy in English and Spanish
America. Berke­ley: U of California P, 1994. Print. (Latin American Studies)
-- Hemispheric History (1990s “Comparative cultural and sociopolitical histories”)
Voigt, Lisa. Writing Captivity in the Early Modern Atlan­tic: Circulations of Knowledge and
Authority in the Iberian and English Imperial Worlds. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina
P; Williamsburg: Omohundro Inst. of Early Amer. Hist. and Culture, 2009. Print.
--Colonial Period
Wertheimer, Eric. Imagined Empires: Incas, Aztecs, and the New World of American Literature,
1771–1870.  Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1999. Print. (Postcolonial Approach)
--Colonial Period
Wilks, Jennifer M. “Writing Home: Comparative Black Modernism and Form in Jean Toomer
and Aimé Césaire.” Modern Fiction Studies 51.4 (2005): 801–23, 980. Print.
--Race and Ethnic Studies
-- in dialogue with African American Literatures
Zamora, Lois Parkinson. The Inordinate Eye: New World Baroque and Latin American Fiction.
Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2006. Print.
———. The Usable Past: The Imagination of History in Re­cent Fiction of the Americas.
Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1997. Print.
———. Writing the Apocalypse: Historical Vision in Con­temporary U.S. and Latin American
Fiction. Cam­bridge: Cambridge UP, 1989. Print.
--Hemispheric Literary Studies (1990s and before)
Journals and Special Issues
Review of International American Studies (2006) (not solely dedicated to Hemispheric but figures prominently)
Comparative American Studies (2002)
Fox, Claire F. “Commentary: The Transnational Turn and the Hemispheric Return.” American
Literary History 18.3 (2006): 638–47. Print.
———. ed. Critical Perspectives and Emerging Models of Inter-American Studies. Spec. issue
of Comparative American Studies 3.4 (2005): 387–515. Print.
Kadir, Djelal, ed. America: The Idea, the Literature. Spec. issue of PMLA 118.1 (2003): 1–208.
Print.
Moya, Paula, and Ramón Saldívar, eds. Fictions of the Trans-American Imaginary. Spec. issue
of Modern Fiction Studies 49.1 (2003): 1–180. Print.
Shukla, Sandhya, and Heidi Tinsman. Our Americas: Po­litical and Cultural Imaginings. Spec.
issue of Radical History Review 89 (2004): 1–250. Print.
Levander, Caroline F., and Robert S. Levine, eds. Hemi­spheric American Literary History. Spec.
issue of Amer­ican Literary History 18.3 (2006): 397–656. Print.
———. eds. Hemispheric American Studies. New Bruns­wick: Rutgers UP, 2007. Print.

Book Series
Caroline Levander and Anthony Pinn new Oxford Series: Imagining the Americas
Books under contract:
Thomas Beebee, Millennial Literatures of the Americas, forthcoming November 2008.
Caroline Rody, The Interethnic Imagination: Roots and Passages in the Contemporary Asian American Novel, forthcoming 2009.
Elizabeth Russ, Modern and Postmodern Plantations: Gender, Race and Nation in New World Imaginaries, forthcoming 2009.
Elizabeth Fenton, Religious Liberties: Anti-Catholicism, Liberalism, and Nineteenth-Century American Literature, under contract.
Terrence Johnson, Tragic Soul-Life: WEB Du Bois and the Redemption of American Democracy, under contract.

Literary Anthologies
Castillo, Susan, and Ivy Schweitzer, eds. The Literatures of Colonial America. Oxford:
Blackwell, 2001. Print.
Bauer, Ralph, and Jay Parini. The Colonial Americas. Boston: Thomson, 2008. Print. Wadsworth
Themes in Amer. Lit. 1.

Digital Archives
Rice Americas Digital Archive (www .ruf .rice .edu/ ~americas/ archive)
Early Americas Dig­ital Archive (www .mith2.umd .edu/ eada/)
The Americas Colloquium at Rice University (http://americascolloquium.rice.edu/index.html)

University Based Studies Program
Vanderbilt’s Center for the Americas, directed by Vera Kutzinski (www .vanderbilt .edu/ americas/ English/ index .php)

SUNY Buffalo’s Center for the Americas and Duke’s Center for North American Studies, which broadened its original focus from Canadian studies to include comparative and international-relations research about the United States, Canada, and Mexico

Wesleyan University’s American studies department, which offers “Comparative Americas” courses alongside classes focused solely on the United States

The program in inter-American studies in Penn State’s comparative lit­erature department

The Comparative American Studies Program at Oberlin (www .oberlin .edu/ CAS/);

The Hemi­spheric Institute on the Americas at UC Davis (hia .ucdavis .edu)

Duke’s Center for North American Studies, which in 1998 broadened its original focus on the United States to include Canada and Mexico

NYU’s Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics (hemi .nyu .edu)

Out­side the United States
“North Ameri­can studies” have long adopted a transnational perspective by focusing on the United States and Canada.

Renvall Institute for North American Studies at the University of Helsinki

The Swedish Institute for North American Studies at the University of Upsala

The John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies, in Berlin

TheNorth American Studies Program at McGill Uni­versity, in Montreal

Transinstitutional Studies Network
Tepoztlán Institute was formed in 2003 with the mission to “facilitate an intensive dialogue be­tween North American and Latin American graduate stu­dents and junior and senior faculty members” (Tepoztlán Institute).

A number of these networks, such as the Inter-American Cultural Studies Network, had already origi­nated during the early 1990s, especially in Latin America.

Congresses
Reflections on the Future: Hemispheric Dia­logues on the Intersections of Latina/o-Chicana/o-Latin American(s) Studies, UC Santa Cruz, 20–21 Feb. 2004 (als .ucsc .edu/ hemispheric_ dialogues/ events/ conf2004 .html)

In Comparable Americas: Colonial Studies after the Hemispheric Turn, Newberry Lib. (Chicago), 30 Apr. 2004 and Univ. of Chicago, 1 May 2004 (www .newberry .org/ renaissance/ conf-inst/ challenges .html)

 Early Ibero/ Anglo Americanist Summit, held in Tucson in 2002 (www .mith2.umd .edu/ summit/ Ibero_ anglo .html), in Providence in 2004 (www .mith2.umd .edu/ summit/ home .html), and to be held in Saint Augustine in 2010 (www .mith2 .umd .edu/ fellows/ bauer/ summit3/index .html).

Seminars
2007 National Endowment for the Hu­manities seminar Hemispheric American Literature (dir. Adams and Levander) set out “to explore the new possibili­ties for American literary study opened up when ‘America’ is understood not as a synonym for the isolated United States, but as a network of cultural filiations that have ex­tended across the hemisphere from the period of coloniza­tion to the present” (Hemispheric American Literature).

Professional Organizations
Although the new International American Stud­ies Association was founded not exclusively to promote hemispheric scholarship but rather to create a supra­national institutional structure for American studies scholarship, it has explicitly emphasized the hemispheric approach since the beginning. According to its Web site, its mission is to further “the international exchange of ideas and information among scholars from all nations and various disciplines who study and teach America regionally, hemispherically, nationally, and transnation­ally” (International American Studies Association).